Your Shower is Awful – A Rundown

Photo by Karla Alexander on Unsplash

In case you all didn’t know, I travel a lot. In my day job, I’m a User Experience guy, and that never quite switches off. It’s my job to make products clear, empowering and delightful.

  • Clear: Users can correctly intuit what to do with the system.
  • Empowering: The system serves the reasonable needs of the users in a naturalistic way.
  • Delightful: The system delivers unexpected delight.

I’ve discovered in my travels that, aside from forks, knives and spoons, most of our everyday objects are poorly designed. It’s almost like the manufacturers have no idea what it’s like to actually live with their products.

The humble shower faucet has more bad variations on this theme than anything else, and I’ve become a little obsessed because they’re non-electronic systems that totally suck. A shower is a two-dimensional interface (pressure/temperature), and in theory, it should be simple, right?

Have a look at some of my favorites.

Mental model mismatch: the system appears to be using one control methodology, but is using another.

More bad plumbing #ux. You may think you pull the rod toward you. You are wrong.

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Concepts of UX in Writing: Progressive Disclosure

tl;dr

Use the UX concept of progressive disclosure to keep your readers interested and alert when describing difficult settings. Use of this concept will give facts a more organic, natural revelation.

This is the first part in a series on User Experience (UX) Concepts in Writing. For more information on UX and other important software design ideas, check out the Wikipedia article.
Continue reading Concepts of UX in Writing: Progressive Disclosure